Orange County Public Schools Awarded the Broad Prize

Orange County Public Schools Awarded the Broad Prize

 

The Orange County Public School District was a proud co-winner of the 2014 Broad Prize for Urban Education. The annual $1 million award—the largest education prize in the country—honors urban school districts that demonstrate the greatest overall performance and improvement in student achievement while reducing achievement gaps among low-income students and students of color.

 

Finalists were selected from among 75 of the country’s largest school districts by a review board of 13 prominent education researchers, policy leaders, practitioners and executives from leading universities, education associations, civil rights advocacy organizations, think-tanks and foundations that evaluated publicly available academic achievement data. This marks the first year since the prize’s founding in 2002 that the review board has opted to name only two finalists instead of either four or five as in previous years.

 

The other co-winner was Gwinnett County Public Schools in Georgia. Both districts received $500,000 in college scholarships for graduating high school seniors.

 

Among the reasons that OCPS was chosen as a 2014 Broad Prize winner:

 

  • A greater percentage of African-American students are reaching advanced academic levels in Orange County than in other districts in Florida. In 2013, the percentage of Orange County’s African-American students in elementary, middle and high school who performed at the highest achievement levels (Levels 4 and 5) in science ranked in the top 20 percent statewide compared to other African-American students. In addition, the percentage of Orange County’s African-American elementary and middle school students performing at the highest achievement levels in reading ranked in the top 20 percent of African-American middle school students in the rest of Florida. For example, 16 percent of Orange County’s African-American elementary school students reached advanced academic levels on the state science assessment compared with 12 percent of African-American elementary school students in the rest of the state.

 

  • In recent years, Orange County narrowed income and ethnic achievement gaps. The gap between OCPS’s Hispanic students and the rest of the state’s white students narrowed in elementary, middle and high school reading and science and in elementary and high school math. The gap between OCPS’s low-income students and the rest of the state’s non-low income students narrowed in elementary, middle and high school reading and math and in elementary and middle school science.

 

  • Orange County’s college-readiness has improved. Between 2010 and 2013, Orange County’s participation rates and average scores on Advanced Placement exams simultaneously increased for all students and notably for Hispanic juniors and seniors. For example, AP participation by Hispanic juniors and seniors increased 5 percentage points over this period, while passing rates increased 2 percentage points.

 

There are some amazing new homes in Winter Garden, FL right now. Windermere, Florida, real estate, is also highly desirable. Both communities are in the Orange County Public School District.

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